Mudra Monday: Jalodar Nashak Mudra

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The name of this mudra is made up of three separate words: jal meaning 'water,' udar meaning 'stomach' and nashak meaning 'to finish'

Jalodar Nashak mudra is a yogic hand gesture thought to have a healing effect on its practitioner by promoting the balance of water within the body.

By controlling any excess of water, this mudra is credited with reducing swelling throughout the body, bringing relief to menstrual cramps, restoring skins moisture and treating excessive salivation or urination, a runny nose and watery eyes.

To perform this mudra, the tip of the pinky finger bends down towards the base of the thumb. The thumb then lightly presses the small finger down towards the palm of the hand. The remaining three fingers should be extended yet relaxed. In this constellation, the small finger represent the water element.

Elements: Water.

If you'd like to know more about Hasta Mudras you can read my introduction to the topic here and find all previous Mudra Monday blogposts here.

Illustration © estudio mosa 2018

Mudra Monday: Brahma Mudra

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Brahma is one of the three gods of the Hindu trinity that is responsible for the creation, preservation and destruction of the world.  Brahma has four heads and is able to see everywhere at the once. The word itself translates from Sanskrit as 'divine,' 'sacred' or 'Supreme Spirit.'

Brahma Mudra is a hand gesture used across yoga asana, meditation and pranayama practice. Sometimes also referred to as 'the gesture of all-pervading consciousness,' Brahma mudra helps to promote a complete breath during pranayama breathing practices and affects the flow of pranic energy (life force) around the body, calming the mind and energising the body.

Brahma mudra is best practiced in a comfortable seated position, such as vajrasana or padmasana. Both hands form fists with the fingers wrapped around the thumbs and the palms facing up. The knuckles of both hands are then pressed together with the hands gently resting against the pubic bone. Yogis who are kapha dosha dominant should only practice this mudra for a limited length of time.

Actively applying pressure to both the knuckles and the pubic bone helps to lift the chest, lengthens the upper body and strengthens the neck muscles, which allows the lungs to expand more fully as we engage in conscious breathing during pranayama practice. Additionally, this mudra is thought to enable practitioners to reach a higher meditative state wherein negative energy is lifted and a deeper level of focus can be reached.

Elements: All.

If you'd like to know more about Hasta Mudras you can read my introduction to the topic here and find all previous Mudra Monday blogs here.

Illustration © estudio mosa 2018

Mudra Monday: Hakini Mudra

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Derived from Sanskrit, Hakini means "power" or "rule."

Hakini Mudra boosts memory power, increases our mental focus, energises the brain, promotes calmness and improves the connection between the right and left hemispheres of the brain. It is said to summon the energy of the sixth chakra, located in the Third Eye space between the eyebrows, which is seen as the gate to enlightenment and thus stimulates out intuitive senses.

Stimulating the communication between the left side of our brain, which is chiefly associated with logical thought processes, and the right side of the brain, which is associated with creative thinking, during our meditation practice can help us find that mental balance with more ease.

To perform Hakini mudra, bring the palms in front of the body with each palm facing the other. Bring the finger tips of both hands together by letting them maintain light contact. Focus on the third eye chakra. Place the tongue against the roof of the mouth and inhale. Relax the tongue while exhaling. Repeat this series of movements for several minutes.

Elements: All.

If you'd like to know more about Hasta Mudras you can read my introduction to the topic here and find all previous Mudra Monday blogs here.

Illustration © estudio mosa 2018